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Dr Phil McGraw News

A Letter From Tricia: Identical Twin In Recovery From Serious Eating Disorder

A Letter From Tricia: Identical Twin In Recovery From Serious Eating Disorder

Dr. Phil met 16-year-old identical twins Taylor and Tricia in 2016 when they each weighed less than 80 lbs. The sisters were referred to separate treatment facilities to address their eating disorders, and as of September 2019, report having gained over 40 lbs. each.

TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: Teen in crisis?

Taylor and Tricia came back to the Dr. Phil stage for an update on their recovery

Watch: Identical Twins Who Were Starving To Death Return!

Additionally, the twins have written letters about their recovery – and to thank Dr. Phil for his assistance in finding them help. Below is Tricia’s letter. Check here to read the letter from Taylor.

Tricia’s Letter:

Hello everyone, my name is Tricia. As some of you may already know, I am one of the twin girls that was on the episode Identical Twins Starving to Death: Who’s to Blame? in August 2016.

I’m here today at 19 years old, to share the rest of my story.

I just want to take a minute of everyone’s time today to share something I wrote and before I begin, I want to thank Dr. Phil and everyone for having me here today.

If you are reading this and are struggling, I want to let you know that there is hope. If you feel everyone is against you, and you are alone - there is hope. Hope is one of the biggest things I believe in. You are never alone in this fight. Reach out to someone, even to myself if you’d like. Reaching outlets your brain know there is still a “you.”

An eating disorder is more of a mental disorder where a voice in your head takes over. Talking to the voice only makes it weaker and the weaker it gets, the easier the day becomes. I learned this through the treatment center that Dr. Phil helped me get to.

I’m not going to sit here and lie and say it was easy. Recovery is hard. There have been days where I didn’t feel like fighting. Where I wanted to give up. Where I felt alone. But what lead me to keep fighting the fight is hope. I had to believe in myself to succeed.

Throughout my recovery, I’ve learned that recovery to me means finding yourself. It means being willing to really get to know yourself, and open up to the belief that you can actually love who you are. All of you. Even the parts that confuse you or frighten you, or that you don’t like

so much. It means the ability to let go of the person you thought you would be, or think you should be, and allow yourself to unfold into the person you truly are.

Today I learned who I am, and will continue to learn my true self. Life is truly beautiful. And it is a gift that I have it every day.

Before I end, one huge shout out to my family, and my fiancé and his family. You guys have really been my biggest motivation and I’m so thankful for each of you! I love you guys.

And finally to Taylor. Thank you for standing by my side. You have encouraged and push me to be the best version of myself. You are my biggest motivation in life. Sunny days or rainy days, you’d be there in a heartbeat. I just want to let you, and everyone reading this know, how proud I am of you!! Continue to build yourself, and I’ll guide you every step of the way. I truly believe I will never be able to thank you enough, no matter how many times I say it. I love you and your beautiful soul, tremendously.

Sincerely with love,

Tricia Rose

TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: Need Dr. Phil to get real with someone?

 

Posted on 24 September 2019 | 1:01 am

A Letter From Taylor: Identical Twin In Recovery From Serious Eating Disorder

A Letter From Taylor: Identical Twin In Recovery From Serious Eating Disorder

Dr. Phil met 16-year-old identical twins Taylor and Tricia in 2016 when they each weighed less than 80 lbs. The sisters were referred to separate treatment facilities to address their eating disorders, and as of September 2019, report having gained over 40 lbs. each.

TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: Teen in crisis?

Taylor and Tricia came back to the Dr. Phil stage for an update on their recovery.

Watch: Identical Twins Who Were Starving To Death Return!

Additionally, the twins have written letters about their recovery – and to thank Dr. Phil for his assistance in finding them help. Below is Taylor’s letter. Check here to read the letter from Tricia.

Hi everyone, as many of you know my name is Taylor. This is my second time going on Dr. Phil. The first time was in August 2016, Identical Twins Starving to Death: Who’s to Blame? I highly would suggest watching that episode. It will not only give you the reason why I’m appearing back on the show, but it’ll show you how serious an eating disorder can be. I was 16 when that show was aired. Today, I am returning as a 19-year-old recovered anorexic/bulimic. Not only am I returning as recovered, but also my beautiful journey partner, Tricia is as well.

With being away from home and hospitalized made me dramatically scared. I was hopeless, I was beyond lost in my mind, lost at who I was becoming. I began my treatment in Chicago Illinois. Treatment started off very oddly to me. I kept losing weight to the point I got discharged and placed into a hospital facility that specializes with eating disorders. It was a very low feeling for me knowing that I’m only 16 years old alone in a hospital I had no idea about, in a totally different state than what home I was.

The hardest part was being away from home. All I wanted was some sort of comfort. My beautiful mother actually drove to Chicago to come give me the comfort I needed. All I needed was a hug from her and for her to let me know everything will be okay. That is what pushed me to keep going and to keep striving for what I wanted.

Later on, I returned to the treatment facility. I remember instantly crying, crying because this was the biggest change I had to ever go through. To finding my balance with food, to finding the balance in my mind to blur that voice of “Ed” (eating disorder) out, and most importantly to love the person I was becoming.

My sister and I were separated from each other for 2 months, my sister and I never experienced being away from each other longer than 2/3 days at a time. I remember girls on my lodge asking me if I was okay, and that’s when I started building a relationship with them. Being a twin is a very unique bond that I get to experience.

Recovery was also very challenging to me. It’s just like learning something new. You’re so unsure of how things are supposed to go, you’re unsure of your emotions and unsure of what to expect. I had to constantly remind myself of who I am and who I was. I had to tell myself little things like “You can do it”, “Be brave”, “Recovery is possible”, and “always believe in yourself”. I told myself I’d actually be living.

By living I mean doing things I couldn’t do when I was stuck in the position of having the disorder. I didn’t enjoy living at the age of 16. I isolated myself from the world. I didn’t want to go to school, I didn’t want to go to work (simply because I had no energy) I hardly would see friends and family. I missed out on so much opportunity throughout those years. It was the biggest thing I’ve held against myself in treatment.

Treatment was hard, full of tears, frustration, new beginnings and most importantly a new me. One thing that stuck with me throughout my recovery journey would have to be “step outside of your comfort zone” be uncomfortable, and accept it! Learn to deal with being uncomfortable and find comfort in the mind with it. Timberline Knolls not only helped me with coping skills but they helped me meet so many other girls of all ages struggling with disorders and showed me how to so positive each and every day!

Being away from Tricia was miserable for me. As soon as I got to treatment I said my goodbyes to Tricia I immediately teared up, the girls on my lodge made me feel as if I had my sister with me. These girls became sisters to me and helped me get through this stage in recovery.

After treatment I was recovered for a while, then everything started to fall backward on my end me, I went back to square one and began to relapse. I felt so hopeless, so disappointed in myself, and upset at the fact I was losing myself to this disorder again. I slowly stopped trying to get better because I knew I “failed” and my mind didn’t want to accept failure in recovery. I slowly developed that failure is okay! Failure is a part of a recovery journey. failure only meant it was a slip-up, a setback, and that it didn’t have to be forever if you kept pushing for recovery.

I remember one Saturday night, I was really thinking about my recovery and my future. I didn’t want to live like this, I knew I wanted to change again. That’s when I developed a plan, a plan to get better and to fight for recovery again. I didn’t want to live the life I was living anymore and that’s what stuck with me to get better.

A huge thank you to Dr. Phil for guiding me into the direction of recovery and a healthier lifestyle. Thank you to my amazing family and friends for tremendously believing in me and supporting me.

There is one special "thank you" I feel like I need to give. To my beautiful mother. I know you’re reading this and I never really got the chance to thank you enough for all the hard work and effort you put into my recovery journey, to reaching out to Dr. Phil and getting us to where we stand today. You have been my biggest supporter since the day you found out I struggled with this disorder.

You didn’t even think twice about giving up on me. You strived to find me the correct help that I needed. You didn’t let me fight this alone. You stood by me and made me feel strong. So, mom, I wish I could say this a million times I’m so lost at what words to even use to say thank you. Thank you from the very bottom of my heart. You are one of a kind and I can’t express how much your dedication to me means to me. I owe you more than the world and not a single bit less.

Although, I have lost tons of friends throughout my recovery journey because I needed to focus on me and put me first. That’s okay though, some people just don’t have the mindset to understand mental illness as deep as some people do. To the girls who are standing by my side today, you guys encourage me every day to keep reaching for the goals I have in mind for myself and to stay recovery-focused.

Just one last thing, I wanted to take a brief moment and congratulate my beautiful sister, Tricia. Tricia, knowing I went through this was extremely hard for me but knowing you faced the same struggles as me. It completely broke my heart; I knew from day one you would beat that demon! No matter how many slip-ups, fall downs or setbacks, I never lost hope in you. I knew you would be the strong woman you are and fight through it. Walk with your head held high and be ready for what challenges come next in life!

Today I can proudly walk across the stage and say I am beat the demon! I am a recovered anorexic/bulimic. Thank you to everyone for believing in me and to everyone who didn’t, look where I am today!

To all the young individuals struggling with something out there. Speak up! Stand up! Reach out for help, and reach for you dreams!

Sincerely,

Taylor Ann

TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: Need Dr. Phil to get real with someone?

Posted on 24 September 2019 | 1:00 am

Back-To-School Prep for College Students: Consider Vaccination Against Meningitis B

Back-To-School Prep for College Students: Consider Vaccination Against Meningitis B

Every summer, college students (and their parents) plan back-to-school shopping trips in anticipation of the fall semester. But somewhere between buying dorm supplies and textbooks, it’s easy to skip one of the most important stops to prepare for what’s ahead: the doctor’s office. You may have checked every box on your list, but if you haven’t scheduled a wellness visit for your teen, they may not be ready for school just yet.

Because of living in close quarters with each other and engaging in certain behaviors, such as sharing drinks and eating utensils and kissing, college students have had higher rates of meningococcal disease, an uncommon but potentially life-threatening illness also known as meningitis.

Early symptoms of meningitis may be similar to and mistaken for those of the flu, but meningitis can progress quickly and potentially be fatal, sometimes within 24 hours. One in ten people infected with meningitis will die and one in five will suffer long-term consequences, such as loss of limbs, brain damage, hearing loss and nervous system problems.

Vaccination is the best defense against meningococcal disease, although vaccination may not protect all recipients. There are two different types of meningococcal vaccines and both are needed to help protect against the five vaccine-preventable groups of meningitis – A, C, W, Y and B.

Routine vaccination against meningitis groups A, C, W and Y has been recommended for adolescents since 2005. However, there were no vaccines available to help protect against meningitis B until late 2014. If you aren’t sure whether your teen has received both types of vaccines, scheduling a wellness visit is a great way to make sure they’re up-to-date.

According to the CDC in 2017, only 14.5% of teens have received a vaccine that helps prevent meningitis B. From 2011 through March 2019, meningitis B caused all US college meningococcal outbreaks, which involved 13 campuses, 50 cases, and 2 deaths among an at-risk population of approximately 253,000 students.

To help protect your teen while they’re away at school, talk to their doctor about meningococcal vaccination and visit meningitisb.com to learn more.

Posted on 6 September 2019 | 12:00 am

9 Things The Media Should Avoid When Reporting On Suicide

9 Things The Media Should Avoid When Reporting On Suicide

Dr. Phil says there is a need to exercise sensitivity when discussing death by suicide, so as not to glamorize the act or give rise to copycats.

When reporting about suicide, there are certain guidelines to follow. According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, ReportingOnSuicide.org and other sources, don’t do the following:

  • Use big or sensationalistic headlines, or prominent placement
  • Include photos/videos of the location or method of death
  • Include photos/videos of the grieving family, friends, memorials, or funerals
  • Describe as inexplicable or “without warning”
  • Refer to suicide as “successful,” “unsuccessful,” or a “failed attempt”
  • Investigate/report on suicide as you would a crime, rather than health issue
  • Describe in strong terms such as "epidemic" or "skyrocketing"
  • Release the contents of any “note”, if left by the deceased
  • Use first responders instead of experts as source of the causes of suicide

If someone you know is is talking about or planning to take his or her life, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1 (800) 273-TALK (8255).

Source: ReportingOnSuicide.org

Posted on 8 May 2017 | 12:00 am

Domestic Violence Resources

Domestic Violence Resources

If someone you know is in an abusive relationship — or if that someone is you — there are places you can turn for help. The following is a list of resources for victims of domestic violence:

National Domestic Violence Hotline:
(800) 799-SAFE (7233)
or 800.787.3224 (TTY)
http://www.thehotline.org

National Network to End Domestic Violence
(202) 543-5566
http://www.nnedv.org

American Psychiatric Association (APA)
(703) 907-7300
https://www.psychiatry.org/

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Phone: (202) 745-1211
Phone: (303) 839-1852
Fax: (202) 745-0088
Fax: (303) 831-9251
http://www.ncadv.org 

The National Center for Victims of Crime
(202) 467-8700
http://www.ncvc.org

Futures without Violence
(415) 678-5500
FAX: (415) 529-2930
http://www.futureswithoutviolence.org

National Resource Center on Domestic Violence
(800) 537-2238
FAX: (717) 545-9456
http://www.nrcdv.org

The Battered Women's Justice Project
TOLL-FREE: (800) 903-0111 ext. 3
Phone: (215) 351-0010
FAX: (215) 351-0779
http://www.bwjp.org

National Battered Women's Law Project
Phone: (212) 741-9480
FAX: (212) 741-6438

WomensHealth.gov
(800) 994-9662
http://www.womenshealth.gov/

National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline 
http://www.loveisrespect.org
(866) 331-9474

Safe Place 
http://www.safeplace.org
(512) 267-SAFE

Break the Cycle 
http://www.breakthecycle.org

Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN)
(800) 656-HOPE
http://www.rainn.org

Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence
Phone: (800) 313-1310
FAX: (415) 252-8991

A Women's Guide to Alcohol and Drug Rehabilitation
(866) 386-1608
http://www.recoveryconnection.org/alcohol-drug-rehab-for-women/

If you believe you need immediate assistance, please call your local emergency number or the mental health crisis hotline listed in your local phone book's government pages. Because DrPhil.com does not operate, supervise, or exercise any control over any of the therapists, resources or referral services listed, it makes no representations or warranty whatsoever, either expressed or implied, regarding any information or advice provided by these referral services. In no event shall it, Dr. Phil or the producers of the show be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on information provided by these therapists, resources or referral services.

 

Posted on 30 October 2015 | 5:37 pm

Teen Domestic Violence Resources

Teen Domestic Violence Resources

If your teenager, your friend, or even you are in an abusive relationship, there are places to go for help. The following resources provide information for teens dealing with relationship violence:

National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline 
www.loveisrespect.org
(866) 331-9474

Break the Cycle
(888) 988-TEEN
www.breakthecycle.org

KidsHealth
www.kidshealth.org

SeeItAndStopIt.Org
(617) 603-2009
www.seeitandstopit.org


If you believe you need immediate assistance, please call your local emergency number or the mental health crisis hotline listed in your local phone book's government pages. Because DrPhil.com does not operate, supervise, or exercise any control over any of the therapists, resources or referral services listed, it makes no representations or warranty whatsoever, either expressed or implied, regarding any information or advice provided by these referral services. In no event shall it, Dr. Phil or the producers of the show be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on information provided by these therapists, resources or referral services. 

 

Posted on 1 October 2015 | 8:49 am

Tips for Hotel Safety

Tips for Hotel Safety

Dr. Rosemary Erickson is a security expert who teaches seminars on hotel safety for businesswomen. Here are her tips for staying safe while in hotels:

  • Tell front desk your main concern is security.
  • Never get a room on the ground floor.
  • Try to avoid rooms where balconies connect.
  • Don’t get an adjoining room.
  • Never prop your door open to go to the ice machine.
  • Always use the deadbolt and make sure windows are locked.
  • Make sure you know the person knocking on your door. If they say they work for the hotel, get their name and call the front desk and double check. Make sure there is a reason why they’re sending an electrician/housekeeper, etc., to your room.
  • Have a doorman escort you to your room at night.
  • Be mindful of long hallways or corners you can’t see around.
  • If you see someone you’re unsure of on the floor of your room, turn around and get back on the elevator — try again later. There’s something known as “push and shove:” when you insert your electronic key, an assailant then shoves you into the room and closes the door. It’s the easiest way for a rapist to get into your room.

 

Posted on 24 May 2012 | 6:00 pm

Internet Safety Resources

Internet Safety Resources

The Internet is a playground for sexual predators. Learn how to protect your children with these Internet safety resources.

To report the sexual exploitation of children, go to CyberTipLine.com. It's monitored by the FBI and the Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team: Keeping Children Safe Online

FBI Publications: A Parent's Guide to Internet Safety

NetSmartz Workshop

RADAR, My Mobile Watchdog

ProtectKids.com 

KidShield.com: Ten Safety Net Steps for Safe Surfing 

SafeKids.com 

KidsHealth.org 

Posted on 28 August 2008 | 6:00 pm

Seven Steps for Making Resolutions Stick!

Seven Steps for Making Resolutions Stick!

Do you want to lose weight, stop smoking or get your toxic personality under control? Dr. Phil outlines seven steps for making your resolutions a reality!


1) Have a specific goal in mind. "If you're going to have a resolution that sticks, it has to be specific as to events and behaviors. You just can't say, 'I want to do better.' What does better mean?" Dr. Phil asks. "What are the things you truly want to focus on?"

2) Set a measurable goal.
"Don't set a goal that you can't measure, because how are you going to know how you're doing?" Dr. Phil asks. "If you say, "I want to be happier,' what does that mean? The number of smiles? You want to reduce the time you spend crying? You want to reduce the time you spend yelling and screaming?"

3) Create a timeline.
"In order for something to be a goal, instead of just a dream, you've got to say what you're going to do by when. 'I'm going to lose 12 pounds by the end of the month,'" Dr. Phil explains.

4) Make your resolution something you can control.
"You can't say, 'My resolution is to have a happier marriage.' You don't control that," Dr. Phil explains. A reasonable resolution could be: "My goal is to be a happier wife," or "I'm going to be a happier husband." The marriage may or may not get better, but you can control what you're bringing to the table.

5) Program your resolution into your lifestyle.
You will never attain your goals by using willpower alone. "Set your world up for it," Dr. Phil suggests. "People who are normal weight have a lifestyle that supports that. People who are overweight have a lifestyle that supports that." 

For example, if you want to stop overeating, remove junk food from your cabinets. If you want to get out of the fats lane, choose an alternate route home so you don't drive by the drive-thru every day. "You've got to understand this is programmed into your lifestyle," Dr. Phil stresses. 

6) Have a step-by-step plan for achieving your goals. 
If your goal is to lose a lot of weight, like Dr. Phil's guest, Jill, you may feel overwhelmed when you step on the scale. Break your goal down into manageable steps. You can start slowly by setting up a circle of support, or by recording your daily food intake in an online journal. "You take little steps; one step at a time," Dr. Phil says. Get a copy of Dr. Phil's Ultimate Weight Solution: The 7 Steps to Weight Loss Freedom to jump start your weight loss!

7) Be accountable for your behavior.
"Somebody needs to be looking over your shoulder, and it needs to cost you," Dr. Phil says. Penalize yourself every time you light up by going without washing your hair for a few days or by going outside without makeup. "You need to have a dog in the fight, so if you don't do what you're supposed to do, there is a cost," Dr. Phil warns.

Posted on 1 January 2008 | 5:00 pm

Alcohol Addiction Resources

Alcohol Addiction Resources

Alcoholism is an out-of-control addiction. This year, Americans will spend more than ,000,000,000 on beer, wine and spirits. If you or someone close to you has a drinking problem, contact the following agencies:
 

Alcoholics Anonymous
https://www.aa.org/

National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD)
https://www.recoverymonth.gov/organizations-programs/national-council-alcoholism-drug-dependence-inc-ncadd
800-NCA-CALL, (800)-622-2255

Adult Children of Alcoholics
http://www.adultchildren.org
(310) 534-1815

Mental Help Net
http://www.mentalhelp.net

National Association for Children of Alcoholics
http://www.nacoa.org
(301) 468-0985

Focus Adolescent Services 
(877) FOCUS-AS

Vital Intervention Professionals
http://www.viprecovery.com
(888) 536-7847

A Women's Guide to Alcohol and Drug Rehabilitation
http://www.recoveryconnection.org/alcohol-drug-rehab-for-women/
(866) 386-1608
 


If you believe you need immediate assistance, please call your local emergency number or the mental health crisis hotline listed in your local phone book's government pages. Because DrPhil.com does not operate, supervise, or exercise any control over any of the therapists, resources or referral services listed, it makes no representations or warranty whatsoever, either expressed or implied, regarding any information or advice provided by these referral services. In no event shall it, Dr. Phil or the producers of the show be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on information provided by these therapists, resources or referral services.

 


TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: Life in crisis?
 

 

Posted on 21 May 2006 | 6:00 pm

Missing Persons Resources

Missing Persons Resources

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
http://www.missingkids.com
(800) THE-LOST or (800) 843-5678

Missing Children Society of Canada (MCSC)
http://www.mcsc.ca
Toll Free: (800) 661-6160 (403) 291-0705
Email: tips@mcsc.ca

Street Teens
A nonprofit, volunteer-based organization dedicated to helping homeless and at-risk teens. Get more information and find out how to make a donation by visiting:
http://www.streetteens.org
(702) 809-3585

FBI's list of Kidnappings and Missing Persons Investigations

Harold Copus, Investigative Solutions
E-mail: hcopus@bellsouth.net
Phone: (770) 547-0045

Posted on 6 February 2006 | 5:00 pm

Missing Persons Resources

Posted on 6 February 2006 | 5:00 pm

Child Sexual Abuse Warning Signs and Resources

Child Sexual Abuse Warning Signs and Resources

If you're worried that your child is being sexually abused, look for the following possible warning signs:
 

  • Changes in behavior: withdrawal, fearfulness, crying without provocation
  • Night sweats with screaming or shaking, and nightmares
  • Regression to more infantile behavior: bedwetting, thumb sucking
  • Loss of appetite or other eating problems
  • Poorly explained injuries: bruises, rashes, cuts, genital pain or bleeding
  • Sudden reluctance to be alone with a certain person
  •  Unusual interest in or knowledge of sexually related matters; inappropriate expression of affection

"They often won't tell you straight up that something is happening to them, because they've been threatened, they may be ashamed, or they may not want to talk to you about it," Dr. Phil says. "Think about these warning signs and ask questions. Create a dialogue if you're worried about what's going on with a child."

For more information and to learn additional warning signs, visit these websites: If you believe you need immediate assistance, please call your local emergency number or the mental health crisis hotline listed in your local phone book's government pages. Because DrPhil.com does not operate, supervise, or exercise any control over any of the therapists, resources or referral services listed, it makes no representations or warranty whatsoever, either expressed or implied, regarding any information or advice provided by these referral services. In no event shall it, Dr. Phil or the producers of the show be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on information provided by these therapists, resources or referral services.

Childhelp USA's National Child Abuse Hotline
1-800-422-4453 (1-800-4ACHILD)
http://www.childhelp.org/

Rape Abuse & Incest National Network
1-800-656-4673 (1-800-656-HOPE)
http://www.rainn.org/

National Domestic Violence/Abuse Hotline
1-800-799-7233 (1-800-799-SAFE) 1-800-787-3224 TTY
http://www.thehotline.org/

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 
http://www.aacap.org

American Psychological Association
http://www.apa.org/topics/sexual-abuse/index.aspx

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
http://www.missingkids.com/home

Medline Plus
https://medlineplus.gov/ 

National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
http://www.ptsd.va.gov/index.asp


ChildLuresPrevention.com
http://www.childluresprevention.com/


TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: Life in crisis?

Posted on 9 November 2005 | 2:08 am

Is Racism Part of Your Life?

Is Racism Part of Your Life?

 

 

  We often think we are open-minded and have more interactions with other races and cultures when in reality, we are limited in our experiences. Take these tests to see if racism is more a part of your life than you care to admit.

The Five Name Game

Name five people whom you know or know of from the following listed groups:
African American
Latino/Mexican
Caucasian/White
Asian
Filipino
Native American
Muslim
Jewish
Vietnamese

If you cannot name people of different groups, perhaps you tend to stay within a narrow group of friends and acquaintances. Try to reach out to other groups to really get to know them.  

The Stereotype Test
Are stereotypes embedded in your views of other races? If you can finish the following sentences, consider how stereotypes may be affecting how you think of people of other races and cultures.

People in this ethnic group do not know how to drive very well:

People in this ethnic group are really good at math:

People in this ethnic group talk really loud all the time:

People in this ethnic group tend to be lazy:

People in this ethnic group always talk in another language:

People in this ethnic group tend to be racist:

People in this ethnic group think they are better than others:

People in this ethnic group play sports and are good dancers:

People in this ethnic group speak more freely about their sexuality:

Males in this ethnic group are better lovers:

People in this ethnic group are shy and closed about their feelings: Women in this ethnic group are easy:

People in this ethnic group practice strange customs:

If you believe in all the stereotypes, you may be judging people first, rather than giving them a chance.

Posted on 21 September 2005 | 6:00 pm

The Foundation of a Good Pregnancy

The Foundation of a Good Pregnancy

Dr. Phil outlines the keys that lay the foundation for a successful pregnancy experience and that lead into good parenting. Plus, learn the number one thing parents do that may put their child's life in jeopardy.

Key 1: Realistic Expectancies What sets people up for disappointment is when they think something is going to turn out one way, but it turns out to be another. That is why it is important to have expectancies that are realistic. The good news is, no matter what anyone tells you about pregnancy, you're about to begin the most joyous, fun, unbelievable time of your life. You're getting ready to change all of your thinking about what having a child is like and you're getting ready to have a completely different attitude. The rewards outweigh the sacrifices 1,000 to one.

Key 2: Preparation You must be as prepared as you can be for what is ahead and what you'll need to do. It is very important to include the baby's dad in the process as well. The father really needs to not be crowded out of the pregnancy and baby experience. Dads: Stake your ground and change those diapers, get involved with bonding with your child right away. Moms: He may look like a bear with boxing gloves on trying to change that diaper, but don't take over. He'll learn just like you did. And together, you can grow as a couple with the joys of the parenting process.

(Advertisement: If you’re interested in diapers for your baby, try Hello Bello, a new line of plant-based products for babies and children that are healthy – and affordable, too -- created by Kristen Bell and her husband, Dax Shepard, along with Dr. Phil’s son, Jay McGraw.)

Key 3: Patience It seems obvious, but it's extremely important to learn patience. Expectant mothers can go through many different emotions due to the hormone fluctuations and they may have difficulty dealing with the changes in their bodies. For the first time, it isn't all about you and it requires a shift in body image. Weight gain is a part of pregnancy and is needed in order to support the growing life inside your body. Research absolutely supports exercise during pregnancy, such as low impact cardio, yoga and light weight training. Women who exercise during pregnancy are much less likely to have postpartum depression, and much more likely to regain their figure and lose the weight rapidly afterward.

Key 4: A Unified Front An expectant couple should provide a unified front in the pregnancy experience. Mutual support between you and your partner can make all the difference. As you work together planning for the family addition, listen to your partner's ideas and negotiate. Things like negotiating a name for your baby can be a fun experience. The number one thing parents can do that may put their child's life in jeopardy is to not cherish the relationship with their partner. When you become a mother and father, you have to be careful to not stop being friends and lovers. It's so easy to be consumed by your child, but you have to remember that kids join our lives, we don't join theirs. Of course they are important, but don't forget to take care of the relationship that is their base of operations. Spend time as a couple and nurture your relationship so your child has a solid future ahead.

Posted on 13 July 2005 | 3:02 pm

Addiction Resources

Posted on 4 January 2005 | 5:00 pm

Measuring Your Child's IQ

Measuring Your Child's IQ

"Intelligence Quotient" (IQ) is a score that reflects how "smart" a person is as compared to others when measured by a particular test or set of challenges. As long as you do not over-interpret IQ, well-designed and standardized intelligence tests are among the most accurate of all psychological tests and assessments.

The following IQ test was designed by Dr. Phil's former professor and mentor, Dr. Frank Lawlis. It was created to evaluate children between the ages of 5 and 16 who are functioning within a broad range of cognitive development.

What you are about to do with your child, through this test, will be a fascinating and enlightening experience, one that helps you understand what your child's intellectual abilities and aptitudes may be.

Click here to download a copy of the test, the directions and scoring criteria (Adobe Acrobat is required. Click here to download the latest version.)

This IQ test was designed for the parent to use, and although its psychometric properties for development were consistent with those used in professional tests, the test is not considered for professional use. It cannot be used for application for jobs, schools or membership in organizations that require intellectual testing. It is solely for the purposes of helping parents understand the cognitive status of their children in general terms for their use in their guidance for their children.

Posted on 13 September 2004 | 9:00 pm

Chemistry Test

Chemistry Test

This test, from Relationship Rescue, is designed to help you gauge how your relationship lifestyle is working. Answer the following questions about the chemistry that exists or doesn't exist between you and your partner. Don't be afraid to tell yourself the truth. As superficial as some of these items may sound, these issues can have a powerful influence on your relationship as a whole.

Click here to view and/or print the test.

More interactive quizzes:

Posted on 11 December 2003 | 8:00 am

Relationship Communication Test

Relationship Communication Test

What type of communication pattern have you and your partner developed within your relationship? This test, from Relationship Rescue, is designed to help you better understand the ways you relate, or don't relate, to your partner. These questions will also help you realize how comfortable you feel with your partner — the person who is supposed to be the most significant and trusted person in your life. This is for your eyes only, to give you a better idea of the type of communication pattern you and your partner have developed within your relationship. Click here to view and/or print the test. More interactive quizzes:
 

Posted on 10 December 2003 | 8:00 pm

Worksheet: Documenting the Facts of Drug Use

Worksheet: Documenting the Facts of Drug Use

To prepare for an intervention, Dr. Phil recommends everyone bring a list of factual data over a period of time that spells out without a doubt that the person is using drugs or alcohol. Include the date, what happened, what was said and done and how it made you feel. Make sure there is no speculation, only facts.

For example: "In August, 2001, I overheard you ordering drugs over the phone. I confronted you, but you denied it and told me I was crazy. I cried myself to sleep that night. I was angry about your accusations and hurt that you wouldn't talk to me."

You can look for specific data in these areas:

Changes in pattern of use: denies use, hides supply, uses alone, increased use, can't stop using, increased tolerance, etc.

Behavior when using: becomes happy/animated/angry, becomes violent, increased arguments/fights, becomes withdrawn/silent, up all night/sleeps all day, etc.

How use is affecting: job, finances, relationships, health, responsibilities, safety, family, etc. Here is a worksheet to help you get started. 

Posted on 5 November 2003 | 8:00 pm

Relationship Health Profile Test

Relationship Health Profile Test

This test, from Relationship Rescue, is designed to give you a quick snapshot of the health of your relationship. Answer each question as "True" or "False." Be honest and go with your first reaction. Do not spend an excessive amount of time debating any one item. Click here to take Dr. Phil's interactive quiz.

More interactive quizzes:  

 

TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: In relationship hell?

 

 

 

Posted on 6 May 2003 | 9:00 pm

Making Resolutions a Reality

Making Resolutions a Reality

Whether you want to lose weight, quit smoking, get your finances in order or spend more time with your family, Dr. Phil has advice to help make your resolutions stick. Remember, winners do what losers don't want to do. Have passion, take action, and you'll get what you're after.
 

  • Set a very specific goal.
    Do you want to work out 30 minutes a day four days a week? Resolving to "be happy," for example, is not specific enough. If you want to spend more time with your family, make an appointment every week to spend time together. For example, Sunday night can become "game night." Define exactly what you want in clear terms.
     
  • Set a goal that has a measurable outcome.
    "Getting in shape" is not quantifiable. Without a goal that is measurable, how will you know when you've made progress or even reached it?
     
  • Assign a timeline.
    "Someday" is not a day of the week. The difference between a dream and a goal is a timeframe for making it happen. A deadline can also help motivate you and prevent you from procrastinating.
     
  • Choose a goal you can control.
    You don't control how much you weigh. You can influence it, and you can control the things upon which your weight is based, but you do not control the number on the scale. In identifying your goal, strive for what you can really create — not just what you fantasize about.
     
  • Program your life with a strategy.
    Willpower is a myth. It's emotionally powered, and emotions are fickle. Wanting to do something — no matter how badly you want it — won't make it happen. You need a plan and you need to change something in your lifestyle. Realistically assess the obstacles and resources involved, and create a strategy for navigating that reality. Your environment, your schedule and your accountability must be programmed in such a way that all three support you. Life is full of temptations and opportunities to fail. Without programming, you will find it much harder to stay the course.
     
  • Identify small steps.
    Major life changes don't just happen; they happen one step at a time. Keep putting one foot in front of the other. Steady progress through well-chosen, realistic, interval steps produces results. Know what those steps are before you set out.
     
  • Create accountability.
    Without accountability, people are apt to con themselves. If you know precisely what you want — and there are real consequences for not doing the assigned work — you are more likely to continue in your pursuit of your goal. Find someone in your circle of family or friends to whom you can be accountable. Make periodic reports on your progress.
     
  • Set your environment up to help you succeed.
    If you're trying to quit smoking, for example, the one thing you need to control is your environment. Set your environment up so that it does not support your habit. Don't keep cigarettes in the house. Don't buy them at all, or you're programming yourself for failure. Your lifestyle supports your habit, so you need to change your lifestyle. Yes, there is a physical addiction. But it's also a choice. Don't use the addiction as your permission slip to keep doing it. Remember that you don't break habits: You replace one behavior with a new one.
     
  • Change your lifestyle.
    If you're trying to get in shape or lose weight, for example, make sure you have a plan and start making a lifestyle change. It is difficult to be overweight without a lifestyle that supports it. Willpower will not make things change. "Gym memberships don't take weight off," says Dr. Phil. "Using them does." Do not feed loneliness with food, he suggests, and be sure to clean up your environment by getting rid of "impulse foods." You can't eat what's not there.

 


TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: Life in crisis?

 

Posted on 6 January 2003 | 6:00 am

Potty Train Your Child In Less Than a Day

Potty Train Your Child In Less Than a Day

What You Need

  • A doll that wets
  • A potty chair
  • Big boy/girl underwear (instead of diapers)
  • Lots of liquids for your child and the doll to drink **Note that the following instructions using liquids also apply to potty training for bowel movements.

 

Consider Before You Begin

  • Development: The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests waiting until 2 years of age to potty train.
  • Modeling: You can demonstrate or have the doll demonstrate the process of "going potty."
  • Motivation: Find out who your child's superhero is. The hero will provide the motivation in this process.
  • Step 1: Teach a Doll That Wets Your child will learn by teaching the doll how to go potty. Have your child name the doll and give it something to drink. Then walk the doll to the potty chair with your child. Pull the doll's "big kid" underwear down and watch the doll go potty together.
  • Step 2: Throw the Doll a Potty Party! When the doll successfully goes potty, throw a potty party! Make it a big blowout with party hats, horns and celebrate. Give lots of attention to the doll so that your child understands that going potty is a good thing. Let your child know that when he goes potty, he will have a potty party too. Not only that, your child gets to call his favorite superhero to report the good news!
  • Step 3: Get Rid of the Diapers At the beginning of the process you placed underwear on your child's doll. Now it's time to take away the diapers and put underwear on your child.

    (Advertisement: If you’re interested in diapers for your baby, try Hello Bello, a new line of plant-based products for babies and children that are healthy – and affordable, too -- created by Kristen Bell and her husband, Dax Shepard, along with Dr. Phil’s son, Jay McGraw.) 
     
  • Step 4: Drink Lots of Fluids Give your child plenty of fluids to drink. The sooner he has to go potty, the sooner you can begin potty training.
  • Step 5: Ten Trips to Potty When Accident Ask your child if he needs to go potty. Your child might say no and that's OK. Because you've given your child plenty of fluids, he will soon need to go. If your child has an accident in his underwear, don't scold him. You want this to be a positive experience. Instead, take your child to the potty, pull his underwear down, and have your child sit down. Do this 10 times. This builds muscle memory and your child will eventually go.
  • Step 6: Let the Celebration Begin! When your child successfully goes potty, throw him a potty party. Most importantly, your child can now call his favorite superhero and tell the hero about what he just did! Enlist the help of a friend or relative to play the hero and take the phone call. When your child has an accident, simply take him/her to the bathroom ten times in a row as you did before. This will continue to build muscle memory. And don't forget to keep up the positive reinforcement.

Posted on 7 November 2002 | 8:00 pm

General and Mental Health Resources

General and Mental Health Resources

If you believe you need immediate assistance, please call your local emergency number or the mental health crisis hotline listed in your local phone book's government pages. Because DrPhil.com does not operate, supervise, or exercise any control over any of the therapists, resources or referral services listed, it makes no representations or warranty whatsoever, either expressed or implied, regarding any information or advice provided by these referral services. In no event shall it, Dr. Phil or the producers of the show be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on information provided by these therapists, resources or referral services.  

Helpguide.org
ww.helpguide.org 

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
(800) 273-TALK (8255) 

Obsessive-Compulsive Foundation
ww.ocfoundation.org/

Vista Del Mar Child and Family Services Self-Injury Program
www.vistadelmar.org

Mayo Clinic
www.mayoclinic.org

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine
http://nccam.nih.gov

National Institutes of Health
ttp://www.nih.gov/

National Institute of Mental Health
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml

American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc.
www.aarda.org

Alcoholics Anonymous
https://www.aa.org/

Adult Children of Alcoholics
(310) 534-1815
www.adultchildren.org

National Association for Children of Alcoholics
(301) 468-0985
www.nacoa.org

Focus Adolescent Services
877) FOCUS-AS
www.focusas.com/Alcohol.html
    

La Hacienda
(800) 749-6160
www.lahacienda.com

Creative Care
(800) 832-3280
www.creativecareinc.com
 

Spruce Mountain Inn Residential Treatment Program
(802) 454-8353
www.sprucemountaininn.com  

National Sexual Violence Resource Center
www.nsvrc.org

Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
www.chadd.org

MINDBody Relaxation Series by Dr. Frank Lawlis
https://www.mindbodybylawlis.com/

National Council on Child Abuse and Family Violence
www.nccafv.org

Substance Abuse And Mental Health Services Administration
(877) SAMHSA-7
http://www.samhsa.gov/
   

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
www.afsp.org
If you are in crisis, call (800) 273-TALK
 

Suicide Prevention
(800) SUICIDE
www.mentalhealth.org/suicideprevention

The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
(202) 966-7300
www.aacap.org

American Psychological Association
www.apa.org

National Youth Crisis Hotline
(800) 448-4663

Covenant House Hotline
(800) 999-9999

Kidspeace
(
800) 257-3223

Childhelp USA National Child Abuse Hotline
(800) 422-4453

www.childhelpusa.org

National Domestic Violence Hotline
(800) 799-7233

Elder Care Locator Service
(800) 677-1116

Ulifeline
www.ulifeline.org

MedlinePlus
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus

About Teen Depression
www.about-teen-depression.com
 

Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network
www.rainn.org          

 

Posted on 31 October 2002 | 8:00 pm

Eating Disorder Resources

Eating Disorder Resources

National Eating Disorders Association
http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org
(800) 931-2237

Anorexia Nervosa and Related Eating Disorders, Inc.
http://www.anred.com

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders
http://www.anad.org

UNC Eating Disorders Program
http://www.psychiatry.unc.edu/eatingdisorders

From the American Academy of Family Physicians
http://www.familydoctor.org

What is diabulimia?

From the show, "'Save My Daughter'"
Dr. Cynthia Bulik
Crave: Why You Binge Eat and How to Stop

F.E.A.S.T. " Families Empowered and Supporting Treatment of Eating Disorders
http://www.feast-ed.org


From the show, "Eating Disorders"
Dr. Laurie Humphries, M.D.
University of Kentucky College of Medicine
Department of Psychiatry

From the show, "Desperate Diets" and "Desperate Diets Update"
La Hacienda
http://www.lahacienda.com

Creative Care
http://www.creativecareinc.com

PychoNeuroPlasticity Clinic
http://www.pnpcenter.com/

From the show, "Dying to Be Thin"
Dr. Michael Berrett
Center for Change 
http://www.centerforchange.com/
(888) 244-8250
 

Posted on 30 October 2002 | 8:00 pm

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